Recipe from Elana’s Pantry – Upside-Down Apple Tartlets

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Upside-Down Apple Tartlets
Here’s another delightful recipe from Elana’s Pantry. Her latest book is available for pre-order now – Paleo Cooking from Elana’s Pantry at Amazon.com.

Upside-Down Apple Tartlets
Serves 8 Sweetness: Medium

Ingredients:
Crust
2 cups blanched almond flour
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1/4 cup coconut oil, at room temperature
1/4 teaspoon vanilla crème stevia
Filling
6 large apples, peeled, cored, and cut into 1/4-inch slices
1 cup apple juice
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
2 tablespoons arrowroot powder
1 tablespoon ground cinnamon

Directions:
Preheat the oven to 350°F. Place eight 1-cup wide-mouth Mason jars on a large baking sheet.

To make the crust, pulse together the almond flour and salt in a food processor. Add the coconut oil and stevia and pulse until the mixture forms a ball.

Transfer the dough to a piece of parchment paper and place in the freezer for 20 minutes.

To make the filling, place the apples, apple juice, lemon juice, arrowroot powder, and cinnamon in a large bowl, and toss to combine. Transfer the apples to the Mason jars so that each one is overfull. Divide the remaining juice from the bottom of the bowl between the jars.

Remove the dough from the freezer, place between 2 pieces of parchment paper generously dusted with almond flour, and roll out the dough 1/4 inch thick. Remove the top sheet of parchment. Using the top 
of a wide-mouth Mason jar, cut out 
8 circles of dough and place one on
 top of each apple-filled Mason jar.

Bake for 40 to 50 minutes, until the juices are bubbling and the crust is golden brown. Serve the tartlets hot out of the oven.

Coconut Whipped Cream
Makes 1 Cup Sweetness: Low
This dairy-free whipped cream recipe calls for full-fat canned coconut milk. The fat is what makes the recipe creamy and luscious; light coconut milk won’t work and results in a watery mess. Serve over Upside-Down Apple Tartlets (page 101) or Peach Cherry Crisp (page 98). See photo on page 100.

Ingredients:
1 (13-ounce) can Thai Kitchen
coconut milk
1 tablespoon honey
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
5 drops vanilla crème stevia
Pinch of sea salt

Directions:
Place the can of coconut milk in the refrigerator at least 24 hours before making the whipped cream, so it is well chilled. Chill a metal bowl in the freezer for 15 minutes.

Take the coconut milk out of the refrigerator and remove the lid. Gently scoop out the coconut fat, placing it in the chilled bowl. Pour the remaining liquid into a glass jar and store in the refrigerator, saving it for another use.

Using a handheld blender, whip the coconut milk fat until light and fluffy, about 1 minute. Whip in the honey, vanilla extract, stevia, and salt.

Use right away or store in a glass jar in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours.

Reprinted with permission from Paleo Cooking from Elana’s Pantry: Gluten-Free, Grain-Free, High-Protein Recipes by Elana Amsterdam (Ten Speed Press, 2013). Photo Credit: Leigh Beisch.

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{ 2 comments… add one }

  • Shayna June 12, 2013, 12:40 pm

    Can you comment re: if you have been using less agave nectar and incorporating more honey? If so, why? Thank you.

    Reply
    • Louise June 12, 2013, 2:26 pm

      Hi Shayna, I never use agave nectar and only rarely use raw honey actually. I feel that it’s healthier to stay away from all sugars as much as possible, but when I do use sugars, I think raw honey is slightly superior to others like agave nectar. The reason for this difference is pointed out by this quote from this Weston A Price article: “The process by which agave glucose and inulin are converted into “nectar” is similar to the process by which corn starch is converted into HFCS. The agave starch is subject to an enzymatic and chemical process that converts the starch into a fructose-rich syrup—anywhere from 70 percent fructose and higher according to the agave nectar chemical profiles posted on agave nectar websites.”

      Reply

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Louise Yang Ancestral Chef

Hi! I'm Louise - I am "beyond gluten-free," grain-free, paleo/primal, a lawyer, an ex-physicist, a cook, a blogger, a Brit living in the US, an ex-violin player, an occasional crossfitter, a mystery book junkie, and of course, I am the Ancestral Chef :) Read my About Me Page for more!

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